Why 4B Meats Wagyu?

Why Wagyu from 4B Meats?

Studies have shown that all-natural, grain-fed, Black Wagyu beef composition is quite different than that of commercial American beef alone, producing meat that is healthier for consumers. Because Wagyu cattle free of growth hormones are fed for a longer period of time than commercial cattle, the fat is higher in monounsaturated fat leading to higher levels of oleic acid, omega-6, omega-3, and other essential fatty acids, thus eating Wagyu regularly may actually reduce the effects of some cardiovascular health issues such as high cholesterol.

Furthermore, Wagyu meat is known for its tenderness, making it palatable to consumers of all ages, including those who have sensitive teeth. Wagyu cattle are fed much longer than commercial cattle, allowing the marbling to become dispersed between the muscle fibers resulting in a product that melts in the mouth and has a distinct, yet enjoyable, flavor.  What's more, the unique blend of ingredients fed by Morris Stock Farm leads to a richer taste in comparison to other feeding programs.

Beef offered by 4B Meats is considered F1 Wagyu, which means all beef is 50% full-blood, registered Black Wagyu crossed with a breed commonly found in America such as Angus.  This allows our customers to enjoy beef that is more nutritious than commercial beef. 4B Meats Wagyu beef is not quite as rich as full-blood Wagyu so our customers can enjoy the benefits of Wagyu at every meal.

Why Dry-Aged?

They say wine gets better with age. Well so does beef.  4B Meats Wagyu beef is normally dry-aged for at least 21 days which promotes connective tissue and muscle fiber breakdown resulting in a more tender cut of beef.  The flavor is more robust due to the natural changes in enzymes and bacteria and oxidation of the fat. The end result is a product that is not your everyday run of the meal beef experience.

Marbling research shows healthy fat in beef has benefits

Fannin, Blair https://meat.tamu.edu/2015/03/26/marbling-research-shows-healthy-fat-in-beef-has-benefits-agrilife-today/

Corresponding research paper:

Marbling: Management of cattle to maximize the deposition of intramuscular adipose tissue

S. B. Smith B. J. Johnson, Journal of Animal Science, Volume 94, Issue suppl_5, 1 October 2016, Pages 382,https://doi.org/10.2527/jam2016-0794

Marbling and its Nutritional Impact on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

Smith, Stephen B. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5018501/ . 2016; 36(4): 435–444. Published online 2016 Aug 30. doi:  10.5851/kosfa.2016.36.4.435

Meat produced by Japanese Black cattle and Wagyu

T. Gotoh H. Takahashi T. Nishimura K. Kuchida H. Mannen, Animal Frontiers, Volume 4, Issue 4, 1 October 2014, Pages 46–54,https://doi.org/10.2527/af.2014-0033

High–monounsaturated fatty acid diets lower both plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations 

Penny M Kris-Etherton Thomas A Pearson Ying Wan Rebecca L HargroveKristin Moriarty Valerie Fishell Terry D Etherton, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 70, Issue 6, 1 December 1999, Pages 1009–1015, https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/70.6.1009

Conjugated linoleic acid–enriched beef production

Characteristics and Health Benefit of Highly Marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo Beef

Gotoh, Takafumi; Joo, Seon-Tea; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5243954/#r012  . 2016; 36(6): 709–718. Published online 2016 Dec 31. doi:  10.5851/kosfa.20.36.6.709

Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men

Adams, T., Walzem, R., Smith, D., Tseng, S., & Smith, S. (2010). Hamburger high in total, saturated and trans-fatty acids decreases HDL cholesterol and LDL particle diameter, and increases TAG, in mildly hypercholesterolaemic men. British Journal of Nutrition, 103(1), 91-98. doi:10.1017/S0007114509991516 https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114509991516

Consumption of high-oleic acid ground beef increases HDL cholesterol concentration but both high- and low-oleic acid ground beef decrease HDL particle diameter in normocholesterolemic men.

Gilmore L. A., Walzem R. L., Crouse S. F., Smith D. R., Adams T. H., Vaidyanathan V., Cao X., Smith S. B. J. Nutr. 2011;141:1188–1194. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.136085 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21525253

Marbling and its nutritional impact on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 

Smith S. B. Korean J. Food Sci. An. 2016;36:435–444. doi: 10.5851/kosfa.2016.36.4.435

Fatty Acids and Wagyu Beef

O Fallon, Jim & Busboom, Jan & Gaskins, Charles. (2018). Fatty Acids and Wagyu Beef, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/265932588_Fatty_Acids_and_Wagyu_Beef

General Information about the Wagyu breed:

Cattle Breeds - Wagyu

http://www.thecattlesite.com/breeds/beef/49/wagyu/

Dry-Aging

Dry-aging of beef

Savell, J. W. 2008. Dry-aging of beef. Center for Research and Knowledge Management, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Centennial, CO. http://www.beefissuesquarterly.com/CMDocs/BeefResearch/PE_Executive_Summaries/Dry_Aging_of_Beef.pdf

The Science of Taste Or: Why Dry-Aged Meat Is So Damned Delicious

McGee, Harold. "The Science of Taste Or: Why Dry-Aged Meat Is So Damned Delicious" Gizmodo 09 December 2011. Web. https://gizmodo.com/5866754/the-science-of-taste-or-why-dry-aged-meat-is-so-damned-delicious 12/09/11 4:15pm

Aging Beef

Yancey, Janeal.  "Aging Beef" The Meat We Eat. 20 August 2018. Web. https://meatscience.org/TheMeatWeEat/topics/article/2018/08/20/aging-beef